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The iconic AK47 rifle has been around for more than 50 years and is still going strong as the choice of rifle for freedom fighters as well as terrorists all around the globe. In that time people have developed synthetic stocks, rail systems and better triggers and muzzle devices for this old war horse. The old style 45* slant brake that came attached to the end of many varieties of AK47 rifles was revolutionary and effective in 1947 but by the 21st century people wanted more options and better ways control the recoil and muzzle rise from their AK47 pattern rifles.

Top Five AK Muzzle Devices

Top Five AK Muzzle DevicesThe iconic AK47 rifle has been around for more than 50 years and is still going strong as the choice of rifle for freedom fighters as well as terrorists all around the globe. In that time people have developed synthetic stocks, rail systems and better triggers and muzzle devices for this old war horse. The old style 45* slant brake that came attached to the end of many varieties of AK47 rifles was revolutionary and effective in 1947 but by the 21st century people wanted more options and better ways control the recoil and muzzle rise from their AK47 pattern rifles. The problem that now faces the millions of owners of AK47 rifles in 2017 is what muzzle device should they consider if they are wanting to upgrade from the stock muzzle device. It was this quandary that prompted us to attempt to answer that very question, in this latest article that we simply titled: Top 5 AK 47 Muzzle Devices . We set no real parameters for our Top 5 list other than the brakes we listed must fit the standard 14-1 Left Hand thread that graces the end of so many AK47 pattern rifles. There is no limit to cost, size, shape, or manufacturer in our very unscientific list, our goal here is to provide you options. The Top 5 AK47 Muzzle Devices we selected will cover a wide range of prices and manufacturers, and styles. Some of them might be a bit more unique or exotic looking than the hardcore AK 47 purists will like, and that’s fine. There is no one size fits all answer to anything in the firearms world so why would accessories be any different ? So without any more delay, let’s get down to business and bring you our Top 5 list in no particular order. Image Courtesy:jerkingthetrigger.com #1 Epsilon AK by VG6 Precision (MSRP $94.99) This brake is one of the more expensive ones on the market and the cost of nearly $100.00 alone is enough to stop some people dead in their tracks. VG6 Precision has built this brake using lessons they learned in the 5.56 version of Epsilon that has been extremely popular. The Epsilon AK brake features treated stainless steel material that is then coated with black nitride finish for longterm durability. The brake measures 2.21″ long and weights in at 2.24 ounces. Potential uses should note that this brake helps with felt recoil but that reduced recoil comes with a downside. Owners of the Epsilon AK brake have said that the brake defiantly increases the felt concussion by neighboring shooters, as well as a marked increase in the sound of the round being fired as well. Definitive Arms: Fighter Brake #2 Fighter Brake by Definitive Arms: (MSRP $39.99) The Fighter Brake by Definitive Arms is a brake that I personally own and have used on my Polish AK for the last several months. This brake was a replacement for the Manticore Arms Nightbrake that wasn’t living up to it’s hype. What I found with the Fighter Brake is a brake that is light weight (1.3 Oz ), compact (1.73 ” overall length), and reduces felt recoil without kicking up large amounts of dust and debris when shooting. The brake is affordable, built in the United States and will count towards your overall part count if you are trying to maintain 922(r) compliance on your rifle, that’s a hard combination of attributes to beat. I can say I’ve used this brake while putting just over 1000 rounds threw my AK47, it’s not a ridiculous amount of rounds but its substantial in my mind. Image Courtesy:akopeartorsunionlocal4774.com #3 Zenitco DTK 2 (MSRP $74.95) When it comes to Russian AK47 accessories ZenitCo is one of the biggest names in the game. Every piece of ZenitCo gear I have ever handled or used it built typically Russian. That is t0 say it’s well built, heavy, durable, and simple and the DTK 2 is all of that. The only problem with the DTK 2 is finding them, especially since the Russian arms embargo started a few years ago it seems everything marked ZenitCo went up in price overnight and became scarce. The brake isn’t light be anyone’s standard (3.7 ounces), but it is relatively short in comparison to other brakes with an overall length of 2.0″. The shear size and location of the side exhaust ports guarantees that recoil will be felt by anyone standing to the left or right of the shooter. As noted this muzzle device might be one of the heaviest on the market and that will turn off many potential owners. The AK47 is heavy enough, adding more weight to the end of the barrel might not be for everyone, but this muzzle device is a hot seller despite it’s robust size and weight. Image Courtesy:kvar.com #4 AK-351 by Arsenal Inc (MSRP $21.29) This offering from Bulgarian AK maker Arsenal is the most affordable on our list but has the least information available about it. What we know about the AK-351 is that it available on www.kvar.com and is designed to be used on rifles chambered in both 7.62x39mm as well as the 5.45×45 mm round. We also know that it features a hard chrome lining and it is designed to allow a user to install this muzzle device and still be able to attach a bayonet to their rifle if they wish. Outside of those known qualities the rest of the AK-351 is an enigma, but at $21.29 it might be worth the overall risk to try it out. The device appears to not have any ports in the twelve or six o’clock positions which should limit any chance of kicking up dust while shooting in the prone position. Image Courtesy:primaryweaponssystems.com #5 J-TAC 47 by Primary Weapons System (MSRP $69.95) Last but not least is the J-TAC 47 by PWS, a unique muzzle device that features an interesting port lay out design. The J-TAC features two large ports that and shaped like the letter “J” which might account for it’s name. Hitting the scale at 2.4 ounces its weights in at about the middle of the pack for the Top 5 we have listed. The brake is 1.95″ long with a .875″ diameter, which is about average with the other highlighted devices in the countdown. The engineers at PWS claim that the shape of the ports will reduce felt recoil by the shooter but will not deliver any noticeable increase in blast noise directed towards anyone standing near the shooter. I have reached out to PWS in an attempt to get one of the J-TAC 47 devices to try for myself and see if it’s marketing hype or if they have figured a way to tame side blast and not compromise the recoil reduction capabilities. What’s Next ? What’s next on the horizon for the continual advancement of the AK47 in terms of muzzle devices ? When we began this search we found several varieties of devices that looked like pronged spikes and spiked tubes that were in excess of four inches long. These aren’t what I would consider to be practical or useful brakes. Any muzzle device should be effective and do what is advertised but not at a cost of being too large, heavy or awkward. Only through range time, trials and error can a shooter begin to get a feel for what sort of muzzle device suits their needs. I’m not too proud to admit that I have made terrible choices on muzzle devices and ended up trying a few different approaches before I settled on the Definitive Arms Fighter Brake. We want to hear your stories and see your pictures, Do you have a muzzle device that has worked particularly well for you ? Maybe you have tried several devices and still have not found the one that fits your needs. We want to hear about all the good, the bad, and the truly ugly muzzle devices that are out there. It doesn’t matter if its for 7.62, 5.45 or 5,56 we want to see them all. Rick

How-To Hand Stipple to Get a Grip On Plastic Guns

How-To Hand Stipple to Get a Grip On Plastic Guns

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d68ede97_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d68ede97_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } A perfectly good pistol … made even better. How to hand stipple the stocks of your polymer-framed pistol for a better grip. Gun owners usually fall into two camps: those who keep their weapons just as they come from the factory and those who do not. Those who desire to keep a firearm in its original factory condition do so for purposes including faithfulness to the original intent of the firearm’s designers or protecting the factory warranty. Those who customize their weapons probably desire to improve it in some way — to increase its functionality or even to personalize it. One camp asks: Why would you permanently change a perfectly good factory gun? The other side asks: Why wouldn’t you? In the interest of full disclosure, I’m in the first camp. For years, handgun owners have modified their steel revolvers and pistols — shortening barrels, porting chambers, changing stocks, and more. With the advent of the polymer-framed pistol, the opportunity to make changes has only increased. One of the most popular modifications to polymer-framed pistols is to add to or change the stocks to improve purchase (the firmness or quality of one’s grip of the stocks). Some handgun owners add a rubber grip sleeve such as a Hogue Hand-All. The Kel-Tec PF-9 is a thin, lightweight, single-stack 9mm pistol offering excellent purchase right out of the box. Stippling the tops of each square made it even better. Others apply a sandpaper-like skateboard tape. Of course, grip sleeves and skateboard tape don’t require physically altering the weapon; those add-ons are easily removed. Other gun owners, however, resort to more drastic measures, including stippling—broadly defined as “drawing, engraving, or painting in dots or short strokes.” In this context, “engraving” seems to fit best as it involves melting the polymer and re-shaping it to improve purchase. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! While companies such as Robar offer custom stippling for polymer-framed pistols — at a cost, but with many advantages — many handgun owners have attempted to hand-stipple a polymer-framed pistol at home. In fact, the Internet abounds with stories, images, and videos of successful hand-stippling jobs as well as those that are, shall we say, less than successful. Related GunDigest Articles Gallery: Most Influential Handguns of All Time New Guns: New AR Rifles Available in 2017 Top 10 Guns You Should Request For Father's Day After reviewing several positive hand-stippling reports, fanciful notions of “I can do that” started to run through my head. Moreover, I thought I could do a decent stippling job on a new Kel-Tec PF-9, a polymer-framed 9mm pistol, with just a hot soldering iron. Would I get a better grip on a pistol or did I need to get a grip on reality? Since this was my first and possibly last hand-stippling job, I decided to start small in two ways: First, I chose a small, inexpensive weapon. The Kel-Tec PF-9 measures 4.3 inches tall, 5.85 inches long, and .88 inches wide and in a blued finish retails for $333. It would be an expensive lesson if I somehow managed to destroy it but not as expensive as some other polymer-framed pistols. This provided only a modest comfort to me. Second, the Kel-Tec’s polymer frame offers stocks with a raised, checkerboard pattern (which, for the record, provide excellent purchase as is). Rather than attempt to stipple the entire grip area, I would only stipple the raised squares, borrowing from a design I had seen in an Internet gun forum. I figured the raised squares offered a little more depth of plastic and therefore greater margin for error. A very short push into the polymer with a hot soldering iron yielded consistent craters measuring about one millimeter across.” At this point, I need to insert all appropriate disclaimers: What I’m about to do might be unwise, if not downright stupid, and probably voids the pistol’s warranty. Regardless, don’t try this at home. In fact, don’t try this anywhere or at any time. Proceed at your own risk. Neither Gun Digest the Magazine nor Kel-Tec is responsible for your foolishness. Consuming raw or undercooked meat, seafood or egg products can increase your risk of foodborne illness. And so on. Working in my professional stippling shop — in my driveway with an upside-down five-gallon bucket (the gun bench) and a broken piece of 12×12 ceramic tile (a safe surface to work with hot tools and melting plastic) — I plugged in the soldering iron and set up the camera. Either I would capture pictures of a successful hand stippling job or provide some emergency room doctor with images of my burnt flesh. This was the point of no return. As soon as that hot soldering iron tip touched the plastic, I was committed.

Honor Defense All-American & All You Need Promotion

Honor Defense All-American & All You Need Promotion

Honor Defense prides itself that their line of firearms are 100% made in the USA. So proud, in fact, that if you purchase any new Honor Defense® pistol from March 15th – July 4 th you’ll receive: -Free 20 rounds of Team Never Quit Ammunition -Free 8 Round Honor Guard Extended Magazine -$50 off a Viridian Green Laser with Holster -50% off Coupon for Accessories and Parts on Honor Defense® Webstore The goal of this promotion is for Honor Defense® to share that Made in America is what makes America great. They want to make sure all consumers know that all Honor Defense pistols are made and assembled by veterans in Gainesville, Georgia, USA. While other companies buy parts from foreign companies with USA subsidiaries or produce their pistols in other countries, Honor Defense® keeps all materials and production in America. It’s easy to get your free items! Simply email or fax the form and a copy (photos accepted) of your receipt to: Fax number: 678-943- 8034 or email: info@honordefense.com For more information about the All-American & All You Need promotion, contact Honor Defense at 678-943-8035 . Click here to download form . Honor Defense firearms represent the next generation of modular handguns. Honor Defense firearms have more features than any other sub-compact pistol. Every part is manufactured in the U.S.A. to our highest standards. You can’t buy a better pistol right out of the box. To create their pistols, Honor Defense secured input from a panel of professionals that have defended our nation or have extensive credentials in self-defense training. For more information, please visit HONORDEFENSE.COM

How to Disassemble an M1A Walkthrough Review for 2020

How to Disassemble an M1A  Walkthrough Review for 2020

The M1A is a classic battle-tested American rifle, which finds its use in competitions and hunting to this day. The M1A is among the oldest breed of firearms still in use by shooters today, which also means that M1A requires a bit of old-fashioned field stripping for cleaning and maintenance. Servicing your M1A regularly will ensure that you can pass this legacy on as an heirloom to your future generations. Here, we’ll learn about the steps, tips, and tricks involved in properly disassembling and then reassembling an M1A rifle for cleaning and maintenance. We will also take a look at some good M1A servicing and cleaning kits available in the online marketplace. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for M1A Cleaning Kits OUR TOP PICK: John Masen - M1/M14 Mil-spec Cleaning Kit Buttstock Cleaning Kit Springfield Armory M1A Cleaning Kit Comparison of the Best M1A Cleaning Kits IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick John Masen - M1/M14 Mil-spec Cleaning Kit Best M1A disassembly toolkit on the market Unused and authentic GI components direct from the WWII era Includes disassembly tool, rod sections, brushes, and a nylon pouch View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Buttstock Cleaning Kit Includes better combo tool for versatility and easy field stripping Dual-reservoir oiler for easy lubrication and carrying lube anywhere Good and compact cleaning kit and can be stored inside the buttstock "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Springfield Armory M1A Cleaning Kit Comes with 100 cleaning patches for better cleaning The plastic case with carry handles helps with easy handling and storage Offers great value for money at its price View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Three Main Groups of an M1A Like most other rifles, the M1A can be seen as a combination of three different groups. These include the trigger housing group, the barrelled receiver group, and the stock group. Their names are almost self-explanatory, but let's elaborate the point for the sake of simplicity. First of all, the barrelled receiver group of an M1A includes the action of the rifle. The parts include the receiver, sights, bolt carrier group, gas system, and the barrel. This is the primary component of the M1A and is the part where all the action happens. Springfield M1A Scout Squad ( Source ) Next comes the trigger housing group. This part includes the trigger assembly and the trigger guard. The trigger assembly itself is a combination of many parts such as springs, sear, and hammer. It can be seen as the on/off switch for the rifle. Finally, we’ll consider the stock group . This group is comprised of the stock, which holds all the three groups together. The stock helps with holding and handling the firearm and is also useful for mounting different accessories such as slings , lights, lasers, bayonets, and bipods . Stocks can be made from wood, polymer, or fiberglass composite. But that’s a topic for a different discussion. M1A Disassembly: Step-by-Step Guide The disassembly of the M1A starts by separating the three housing groups of the rifle. Proper disassembly and cleaning of the M1A requires proper tools or preferably, a proper and complete kit. After we learn these steps, we will review the best M1A servicing kits on the market. Apart from that, keep some basic items such as cleaning solvents, rags, and wet and dry cleaning swabs on hand. M1A Complete Disassembly ( Source ) NOTE: Before you strip your M1A rifle, make sure to follow the basic safety rules for the firearm. Ensure that the rifle is unloaded and the chamber is clear. Wear proper eye protection and other protective gear that might be necessary(apron, surgical gloves etc,.). Once you separate the three housing groups, work only on them one at a time and keep the others set aside. Also remember the proper position of the bolts, pins, and other small components you take out of the rifle. Always treat your firearm as if it is loaded, even if it's not. Step 1 ​ Remove the magazine (which you might have already done) from the rifle and close the bolt. To do this, pull the charging handle backward and allow it to move forward freely as it snaps onto the receiver and closes the ejection port. This step ensures that there’s no tension in the bolt carrier spring and the parts are at ease. Step 2 Your next step is removing the trigger housing group. You might want to grab a punch which fits the hole on the rear of the trigger guard. Insert the punch in this hole and pull the trigger guard up, so it opens up like a hinged door. This might require you to apply some pressure, so don’t hesitate. Be careful while opening the trigger guard. Once it has been released, pull of the trigger housing group from the receiver. Step 3 ​ Now, separate the barrelled receiver group from the stock group. In order to achieve this, you must lay the firearm on a flat surface with the sight facing down. Make sure to do this on a smooth surface and ensure that the sights do not get damaged. Now grasp the top grip of the forend and try to pull the action out of the rifle. You can alternatively give a thump to the rifle so these two groups separate. However, thumping is generally required if you have a match-grade firearm which has been glass bedded or has undergone similar treatment. Part 2 - Disassembly of the Barrel and Receiver Group Once all the three housing groups of the M1A have been separated, your next step is to disassemble the barrel and receiver group. The barrel need not be unscrewed from the receiver since it helps with cleaning. The parts you have to disassemble here are the operating rod spring, guide, and rod and bolt from the receiver. The sights over the top can be left intact unless you really want to meddle with them. Disassembly the three main group ( Source ) Step 4 ​Next, remove the operating rod spring and operating rod spring guide. Place your receiver upside down (sight down) on the table and gently pull the operating rod spring and spring guide to relieve pressure on the connector lock. Now, pull the connector lock toward the side of the rifle where the operating rod handle is located. Slowly remove the rod spring from the action of the M1A. Make sure to carry out this process with patience and precision as the spring is under tension and may fly out. Step 5 ​ Once the recoil spring is removed, the op rod can be removed from the receiver. To do this, slide the op rod back toward the receiver until its guide lug aligns with the assembly notch in the receiver. Now, rotate it upward, pull it out, and you’re good to go. Step 6 ​ Now all that remains in the receiver is the bolt. To remove it, just slide it forward and pull it up to the right. This might require slight wiggling, but make sure not to apply much pressure, forcing the bolt outwards, as this may result in deformation or damage to it. Remember that the bolt doesn’t require cleaning from the inside. Plus, it should not be done, as the reassembly requires special tools and must only be done by a Springfield technician. M1A Reassembly Reassembling the M1A is following the exact reverse procedure of the disassembly. But before you start assembling your M1A, make sure that you have thoroughly cleaned all the required parts. The major parts which require cleaning are the barrel, receiver, trigger assembly, and bolt. If you have disassembled the trigger assembly, it will take some more time to pack it back. Remember not to open up any parts you’re not sure about putting together again. Assembly of Barrel & Receiver Group If you have separated the barrel from the receiver, put it back on by tightening it over the threading. The gas system components and the sights have to be placed back if they were removed while disassembly. Assembling the barrel and bolt receiver group requires putting back the bolt, operating rod, guide, and spring in place. Step 1: Replacing The Bolt Putting back the bolt requires a bit of maneuvering, similar to what is required for pulling it out. To put it back, hold the bolt by the roller and locking lug and place its rear end inside the receiver bridge with the firing pin tang pointed downward. Turn the bolt a bit so it fits inside the receiver with ease. Once it reaches its position, slide it all the way back to the rear end of the receiver. Step 2: Replacing The Operating Rod After the bolt is seated in place, line up the rod with the retaining lug in the rear and the disassembly notch in the rear side of the receiver and guide it into the track. Once these parts align perfectly, push the operating rod forward until the bolt is closed. When done the right way, the rod should move freely and the bolt should move with it. Step 3: Replacing The Operating Rod Spring Guide After the bolt and op rod have been installed, insert the leading edge of the recoil spring into the recoil tube. Push the spring all the way inside the tube, and apply some pressure on it, so the locking connector aligns with the guide. Push the connector lug out to make room for the guide, push the guide inside, and lock it in place.  Make sure to apply some pressure, and be careful or the spring may fly out. Step 4: Assembly Of The "Three Main Groups" Now the major and most technical part of assembling the M1A is complete. All that needs to be done now is to combine the three main groups we stripped in the first place. Place the barrel and receiver group (sight down) on a flat surface, and align the stock ferrule with the barrel band. Now, lower the action into the stock so that they fit snugly. Next, pick up the trigger assembly and push it right down the stock. Make sure to properly align the guides on the trigger housing with the grooves in the stock. Finally, push down the trigger guard so it snaps into the stock, and you’re done. Cycle the action to check if everything works normally. M1A Complete Disassembly and Reassembly Video Taking instructions from a text is sometimes a bit difficult. Especially when you have to strip down and put together a complex system like the M1A. So we have included a video to demonstrate how to disassemble and reassemble an M1A rifle. The video will clearly outline the necessary tools you require for servicing the M1A. It will explain, in detail, every step of disassembling and reassembling the rifle, whether it is the trigger assembly, gas system, sights, or other parts that can be opened up. You’ll get insights on some smart tips and tricks that’ll make the job easier. A very important and complex part to service in the M1A is its gas system. So the video has a detailed demonstration of how to work with it. Best M1A Cleaning Kits Due to the mechanism and type of ammunition it uses, the M1A requires regular cleaning. Since you now know the proper process of disassembling and reassembling the rifle, you need to find the right cleaning kit to properly care for your weapon. Disassembly of the three housing groups of an M1A doesn’t involve any special tools, so it quite easy to clean the rifle. Having a good cleaning kit will make the job even easier. Here, we’ll review the best M1A cleaning kits which have been handpicked based upon their quality and usefulness. 1. John Masen - M1/M14 Mil-spec Cleaning Kit Buy Now What’s better and more reliable than having a standard issue GI cleaning kit for your M1A? The same kind soldiers used back in the day. This cleaning kit from John Masen has a combination tool handle, cleaning rod sections, bore brush, patch loop, and cleaning pouch. The rod sections can be easily tightened together to form a cleaning rod for the barrel. The combination tool aids with cleaning the bore and other areas with ease. The compact pouch makes the entire kit fit into a pouch the size of a marker pen, so it is easy to carry and store. The kit, however, has no storage space for patches and swabs which might be a drawback for some. 2. Buttstock Cleaning Kit Buy Now This buttstock cleaning kit from Springfield Co. is an amazing toolkit for your M1A. The kit includes cleaning rod sections, a chamber brush, patch loop tip, a .30 cal bronze bore brush, combo tool, dual reservoir oiler, and a convenient pouch to keep everything together. The combo tool helps with the cleaning and maintenance of the rifle. The brushes along with the patch loop tip and the cleaning rod, allow you to clean the bore with ease. As an extra, the kit includes an oiler which can be used to store and apply grease to different parts of the rifle. All of these components can be easily stored inside a cotton pouch which can easily fit inside the stock of your M1A rifle. Considering its price, and the manufacturer, this is probably the best pick on our list. 3. Springfield Armory M1A Cleaning Kit Buy Now This kit from Springfield Armory is a more organized and manageable solution compared to the compact field-based cleaning kits. The kit includes all the components available in a compact kit, such as a combo tool, cleaning rod sections, bore and patch brushes, and an oiler for applying grease to different parts. It also includes some extras, like 100 cleaning patches, so you don’t have to bother cutting up rags or buying them separately. All of these items come stored inside a plastic case with Springfield Armory imprinted on it. This is more like a kit you keep in your house, rather than the one you can carry inside your stock. However, the carry case has its own benefits. Conclusion The disassembly and assembly of an M1A might seem a very complex task, but with the right tools and information, it is as easy as stripping an AR. The M1A is divided into three housing groups, namely the trigger housing group, the barrelled receiver group, and the stock group. The M1A has to be cleaned regularly to maintain its performance, which is where having a good cleaning kit comes in handy.

6 Long Guns To Know From The Spanish-American War

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f377dff21c34_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f377dff21c34_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Spanish-American War was among our country's briefest conflicts, yet it marked the introduction of a number of important advancements when it comes to firearms designs. What were the long guns that stormed the Cuban beaches and charged San Juan Hill? Springfield Model 1892 & 1896 Krag–Jørgensen Springfield Model 1873 Model 1895 Lee Navy Spanish M1893 Colt/Browning Model 1895 Machine Gun Gatling Gun The Spanish-American War was among the shortest conflicts America has fought. But despite its brevity, it was weighty, and not only in determining the United States' place in the world. But also, because it marked the introduction of a number of new firearms concepts and technologies, many of which form the bedrock of today’s guns. The conflict saw the American military’s first widespread use of smokeless powder. It was among the country’s first conflicts in which it utilized the modern machine gun. And it, on the Spanish side, featured gun designs that still to this day define modern rifles. So gird your loins and get set to charge like a Rough Rider into the six long guns (and a couple machine guns) you need to know from the Spanish-American War. "Springfield Model 1892" & 1896 Krag–Jørgensen Photo: Hmaag In perfect 20/20 historical hindsight, the Krag–Jørgensen might seem like a lemon. After all, the U.S. Army was quick to replace it after the Spanish and Philippine wars with the iconic Springfield M1903 . But this view is a bit of a bum wrap. The Krag–Jørgensen beat out a slew of other designs to become the Army’s service rifle in the early 1890s. And it was the first truly modern rifle — by today’s definition — the branch adopted. Consider, it was the first U.S. Army service rifle to fire small-caliber smokeless cartridges, the first to utilize a bolt-action, and the first rifle widely used to feed off a magazine. And by all accounts, the U.S. variants used in the Spanish-American War — mainly the Springfield Model 1892 and 1896, but there were some 1898s — performed admirably. They were the backbone of the Yankees thoroughly blackening a European empire’s eye in the span of weeks. Where the Norwegian-designed rifle comes up wanting is in comparison to the service rifle it was up against — the Spanish M1893, better known as the Spanish Mauser. The American’s .30-caliber had two main deficiencies compared to the M1893. Its unique horizontally accessed magazine could not utilize stripper clips, reducing its rate of fire. And the Krag–Jørgensen had a much weaker action, with a single locking lug, and thus fired the much weaker .30-40 Krag. Despite these shortcomings, the Krag–Jørgensen rifles and carbines still left their marks. And they truly helped usher in the modern era of American military power. Related GunDigest Articles 8 Long Guns You Have to Know from the American Civil War Five Guns You Need To Know From The American Revolution Six All-American Bolt-Action Rifles You Need To Own "Springfield Model 1873" Photo: Rock Island Auction Company The venerable “Trapdoor Springfield” had served the U.S. Military well in the Plains Wars and beyond, but was well past its prime by the time America sailed for Cuba. Nonetheless, the single-shot rifles still found their way into U.S. soldiers' hands. It was a matter of necessity, given there were not enough Krag–Jørgensens to go around, yet ample Trapdoors — from the original Model 1873 clear through to the Model 1888. Typically, volunteer units ended up armed with the antiquated rifles, with a notable exception — the 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry, also know as the Rough Riders. Most likely, the second in command of the unit — Theodore Roosevelt — had the political clout to ensure his men were armed with the modern Krag–Jørgensen bolt-actions. The Model 1873 in all its iterations packed a punch and a half, firing the massive .45-70 Government round. Given it was a favorite of Buffalo hunters, it was more than enough to handle man-sized targets. Aside from an abysmal rate of fire for its time, the prairie cannon had one other huge chink in its armor — it was a black powder rifle. In turn, every shot gave a soldier’s position away, due to a large puff of smoke emitted from the muzzle. Little more was needed for the Spanish troops to rain hell down upon a soldier armed with a Trapdoor. Model 1895 Lee Navy Photo: Antique Military Rifles The Krag–Jørgensen may have been the U.S. Army’s first small-bore rifle, but it was not the first one adopted by America’s Armed Services. That distinction goes to this 6mm gem from Winchester. Designed by James Paris Lee — of Lee-Metford and Lee-Enfield fame — the Model 1895 Lee Navy is easily the Spanish-American War’s most unique rifle. What makes it so special is its action, which at first blush appears to be a straight pull, but is actually a camming action. This single feature made the 1895 Lee Navy a lightning-fast rifle to operate, though it did take some drilling to master the mechanism to its full extent. The rifle’s cartridge, the 6mm Lee Navy, was the smallest caliber used by the U.S. Military until the adoption of the 5.56 NATO. And it produced some pretty impressive velocities for the era, capable of pushing a 112-grain bullet more than 2,500 fps. The U.S. Marines put this ballistic potential to good use in the battles of Camp McCalla and Cuzco Well, in some cases engaging Spanish troops 1,200 yards out. The 1895 Lee Navy saw extensive use in the Pacific during the conflict, and again in the Philippine-American War.

7 Best Trail Cameras

Are you looking for the best trail camera? The good news is there are a lot of products to choose from, but they’re not built equally, Some of these trail or game cameras are barely adequate for taking wildlife images, while others are good enough for professional photographers to use. What we did was round up the seven best cameras and we put them through the paces and highlight their features, benefits and the pros and cons. Top 7 Trail Camera Comparisons Product Name Camera Resolution Video Resolution Reconyx SM750 3.1 MP No Check Price Bushnell Trophy Cam HD (Editor’s Choice) 12/8/3 MP 720p Check Price Covert Extreme Red HD 12 MP 720p Check Price Browning Strike Force 10 MP 1280 x 720 Check Price Primos Low Glow Proof 12 MP 720p Check Price Stealth Cam 10 MP 720p Check Price Moultrie A-40i 14 MP 720з Check Price Reconyx SM750 HyperFire License Plate Capture Camera Reconyx SM750 HyperFire License "Plate Capture Camera" License Plate Photo Capture of moving vehicles up to 50 MPH. Mono-... No Glow High Output Covert Infrared Night Vision up to 50 feet Compatible with Cellular Enabled Upgrade Dual Scheduling powers the camera on/off by day of week and time Extended battery life captures up to 40,000 images Check Price The SM750 is one of the best game camera for your money, and one of the things you’ll notice is that it is covert, so human or animal eyes cannot sense the infrared LED glow. The case design is compact and durable and the set up is straightforward. There’s programmable software included so you can turn the camera and off at specific times and as far as customization goes the 950 is right up there with the best of them as you can adjust the time lapse settings, photo stamp, flash setting, detection circuit, PIR settings and more. Features The image quality is top of the line and photos taken during the day produces more color but those shot at night are pretty good as well. The battery life is long, but do bear in mind it uses a dozen AA batteries; either the Nimh Rechargeable or lithium type will do, but alkaline doesn’t work. Another thing about the SM750 is that it is a rollover type, meaning it is going to roll over and replace photos if the SD card gets filled up. However it’s going to take a while before that happens as an 8 gig card can store up to 28,000 photos. As far as detection circuits go it’s one of the best in the business with a trigger time of 0.19 seconds. The detection range is 70 ft. solid numbers all around. Pros Long battery lifespan Durable Detection circuit is fast On and off setting can be customized Cons Has no video features Bushnell Trophy Cam HD Bushnell Trophy Cam HD Essential E2 12MP Trail Camera, Tan Accepts up to a 32GB SD Card (not included) and operates on 8 AA... 0.3 second trigger speed captures 12MP high-quality images or 720P HD... Multi-image mode to take 1 to 3 images per trigger and field scan 2x... Day/night auto sensor with an Adjustable PIR that is activated out to... Programmable video length from 5 seconds to 60 seconds and a... Check Price Trail camera reviews usually give the Bushnell Aggressor high marks and it’s not surprising. Programming is straightforward and easy to understand, and the Aggressor even comes with a PM, AM or 24 hour run timer if you want the device to run at particular times during the day. Among the settings you’ll likely tinker with are the photo stamp which includes not just the date and time but also the moon phase and temperature. The Picture + Video Mode is easily accessible and you can adjust the PIR settings from low, to regular to high, or you can have it at auto. Features There are three options for flash (low, medium and high) and with a 0.13 second trigger is one of the best right now. With recovery time at less than a second, the Bushnell can snap a picture of an animal in 1.2 seconds once their movement has been sensed. The video trigger time is a bit slower at 2.4 seconds but still impressive, and the 5 second video recovery is also solid. The detection is good for up to 110 ft. and that is good enough to beat most other trail cameras. The picture quality is very good and those taken during the day have depth and color. Overall the Aggressor lives up to the hype and delivers outstanding pictures and images. Pros Detection range is up to 110 ft. Solid case design Outstanding picture and video quality Good battery life Superb detection zone Cons Batteries can be difficult to remove Covert Extreme Red HD Covert Extreme Red HD 40 Camera, Mossy Oak Break-Up Country 40 infrared LED'S 12 MP resolution HD Video with audio 2" Color viewer Time, date, temp and moon phase stamp Check Price Game camera reviews for the Covert Extreme have been positive and that is not surprising given the design and quality. The case design is not that different from the Red 40 cameras that Covert has used, and that’s not really a bad thing. There is a threaded insert measuring 1/4″ x 20 for the Slate River Mount, and there is a bracket built in for a python cable lock. The Covert Extreme comes with a picture viewer so you can see the pictures inside the Covert, and it comes with a wide range of programmable elements including PIR controls, password protection and overwrite function. There’s also a start / stop feature that allows you to turn the Covert on and off at specific times. Features There are a lot of settings here including PIR, SD Card Overwrite Picture + Video Mode, time lapse and more. While there are a lot of configuration options, it’s not difficult to figure them out as the interface is intuitive. The picture quality is good, with those taken during the day having deep color, clear and crisp. The Covert also shoots good pictures in the night with some sharp contrast. The same high quality is present in the video as well, with those taken during the night and day superior to what you usually get in these cameras. The battery life is good, as is the case with most of the cameras here: if you set this camera to take 35 night pictures and 35 day pictures every 24 hrs. the Covert battery will last for over ten months, impressive to say the least. Pros Very good photo quality Internal picture viewer built in Good battery life Cons Detection circuit is average "Browning Strike Force" Trail Camera Browning Strike Force Elite Sub Micro Trail Camera (10MP) |... PIR Motion Sensor - 55' Detection Range 0.4-Sec Motion Trigger Speed Infrared 36-LED Flash with 100' Range Zero Blur Feature for Clear Night Shots HD 1280 x 720 Video with Audio Check Price The name sounds right for the best pick, and the Elite certainly lives up to it. Compared to the 2018 Strike Force HD, the Elite has a quicker picture trigger speed (0.65 s. vs. 0.88 s.) and faster video trigger speed as well (1.04 s. vs. 1.51 s.), and the night video length has been doubled from 10 seconds to 20 seconds. The Elite sports a camo pattern and the setup should be familiar if you’ve used these types of camera before. The SD card overwrite is one of the new design elements and the dynamic video is great for trail videos. At the camera’s rear is a bracket for a python cable lock. Features The picture quality is excellent and images taken during the day are top notch and the color just right. The pictures taken at night are also good with the contrast clearly defined. Unlike those shot with other trail cameras, there is no whiteout here and the edges look fine whether it’s day or night. The video resolution is as sharp as those on previous models, but the big difference here is the dynamic video or smart video technology. When you activate this, the Elite will record videos as long as activity is sensed in front of it. If there is no activity for 4 seconds, the Elite stops recording. The runtime for the Elite is solid too as it can last 7 months, a significant improvement as the older versions could only last 4 months. Another thing that should be noted here is the Elite runs on just 6 batteries whereas others require 8 to 12 batteries. Pros Battery life is good for 7 months (lithium) Pictures taken at night compensate for the animal’s distance Good picture quality Solid video trigger Cons Has a limit of 20 seconds for night videos Primos 12MP "Low Glow Proof" Cam Primos 12MP Low Glow Proof Cam Simple set-up Check Price The Primos camera is well designed, basic but durable. Like the other trail camera models here, the Primos works with the python cable lock and "Slate River Mount" , with the cable lock running around the camera’s front, ensuring the Primos is shut and attached to the tree you chose. Programming design is intuitive and doesn’t even require a user guide: all you need to do is toggle switches or adjust the slides to the setting you prefer, set the date and time and you’re ready. Among the settings that you can adjust are the time lapse, photo stamp, and multi shot. Features As far as speed goes the Primos picture trigger is very fast at .22 seconds and the video trigger and picture recovery time are also good. The detection zone is good for up to 70 ft. and the detection angle is a match for the FOV. Insofar as picture quality goes it’s high quality and the colors have been significantly improved over the previous versions. The night flash has been reduced somewhat and there’s none of the whiteout effect that was common with the previous year’s models. Images taken at night have a sharp contrast but not overpowering. The Primos use of batteries – nimh rechargeable, alkaline or lithium – is good for 7 months (if you take 35 night pictures and 35 day pictures per 24 hrs.). Pros Programming is easy Battery usage is good Video quality is outstanding Pictures taken during the day are crisp and clear Picture trigger speed is excellent Cons Video trigger speed not as fast as other cameras Stealth Cam Infrared Scouting Camera Stealth Cam STC00089 "Infrared Scouting Camera" The McInnis Group, Inc. offers authentic Stealth Cam brand items with... Pixels: 10MP Check Price One of the best trail camera for the money, the Stealth Cam is a white LED camera and is being billed as an alternative to the Incandescent types. One of the benefits of this design is it doesn’t emit a sound when shooting pictures at night. The case design is well thought out: it’s made from durable plastic and compartment for the batteries fit the batteries just right. Programming won’t take long as you can use the viewing screen (which also functions as the image viewer). The design incorporates time lapse capabilities, and the shooting data is not hard to read at all. Features The Stealth Cam comes with the standard settings you would expect such as multi shot, 5 s. – 60 s. video length adjustment, PIR settings, photo stamp and time lapse. The trigger and recovery type are adequate, but the most important feature here is the detection zone which is good for up to 90 ft. and that’s good enough for covering a wide area. The picture quality is good: the day shots are clear and crisp and the clarity is right up there with the top trailer cameras. The night pictures offer good contrast, and there is very little blurring. The flash range extends forty feet and the battery life is decent. It’s difficult to give a specific figure as it depends on how the camera will be used, but on the average the Scoutguard should last 3 months. Pros Good recovery speed Day and night photos are good Durable Cons Trigger speed could be faster Moultrie A-40i Game Camera Moultrie A- "40i Game Camera" (2018) | A-Series| 14 MP | 0.7 S... 14-Megapixel resolution for crisp pictures, and an illume-night sensor... Invisible infrared LED technology for a flash range of up to 60 feet,... A fast .7 second trigger speed helps capture the perfect shot even... Receive the latest images nearly anywhere, the a-40i Pro is Moultrie... Backlit controls and an intuitive interface make setting up the a-40i... Check Price The Moultrie A-40i is one of the best deer camera around and it has been designed specifically for those looking for a budget camera that doesn’t compromise when it comes to quality. The exterior design is similar to M-880 A-40i, but the 550 has the added benefit of having a large latch which is always good, and you won’t encounter any difficulty opening even if your fingers aren’t warm. The battery eject tray works fine and the programming buttons are intuitive as well. The programing options are basic but functional and there are settings for adjusting the video clips (5 s. – 90 s.) photo stamp, time lapse and flash settings. Features The picture trigger time is adequate for cameras in this range as is the video trigger. The recovery times are more than equal to the other models in this class, and at 50 feet the detection range is sufficient for budget trail cameras and can hold its own when taking pictures of moving game. The day picture quality is good and consistent, and it’s rare that you’ll find blurry pictures. Images taken at night are all right and the flash range is exceptional. The camera’s low resting power is another plus so you can expect the batteries to last longer than other budget trail cams. Last but not the least, the consumption during the daytime is adequate as is also the case with the consumption at night. Pros Video quality is very good The battery life is long Durable Cons Video doesn’t have audio What to Look For If you’re looking for the best hunting camera it might be overwhelming as there are so many choices and options. However the following guidelines should help make your decision easier. Here are the primary factors: Viewing screen and setup: is the camera easy to configure and program? Is there an internal viewing screen? Picture quality: you can look at the specs but you also need to examine the actual sample photos to know for sure. Infrared emitters: does the camera use a no glow so it doesn’t get detected or is there an infrared flash? The different flashes have an effect on the night pictures: white flash cameras have color while infrared generate black and white night pictures. Night picture quality: a lot of the best animal pictures can be captured at night so make sure yours can snap good shots at night with sharp contrast and no heavy flash. Battery life: the longer the battery life the better. The two most popular ones are Nimh rechargeable batteries and lithium. Nimh rechargeable batteries save you money in the long term and lengthen battery life during the winter. Lithium batteries on the other hand, can provide the longest lifespan. Detection circuit: this is what the camera uses to sense the presence of an animal and usually they use motion and heat in combination. The detection circuit is based on several factors including recovery time, trigger time and the detection zone. ​Trigger & Recovery Time: the trigger speed and time refers to the amount of time that passes by after the camera detects motion and takes a photo or video of it. The recovery time indicates how fast the camera can store the first image and get prepared for the second picture. Detection zone: this is the area that the camera can detect heat and / or motion and trigger the video or photo. The two most important factors that determine the detection zone efficiency are the detection range and the detection width, and the higher the better. ​ Memory Storage There are two options: an SD card and internal memory. The benefit of internal memory is you don’t have to pay for it, but an SD card provides greater storage capacity and gives you the means to copy the images onto your computer, and it’s easier to view the images on your computer via an SD card so it is more practical. Most of the cameras are compatible with SD cards with up to 36 GB of space, but the storage capacity depends on how you intend to use the camera. If you’re going to shoot high resolution images or video, get the biggest external memory card possible. Other Features to Consider A couple of other features that you may want to consider are audio when recording video and a time lapse mode. With time lapse mode you can set the camera up to take pictures at specific intervals, and when this mode is active your camera can shoot pictures even if the game is beyond the detection zone. Audio in video can also be useful as it adds another dimension to the video, and it’s practical too: if the animal moves out of sight at least you will be able to record its sound. A built-in viewer is a nice extra and while not all trail cameras have this, a viewer can be handy if you want to see the pictures you took right now and you’re far away from a computer. If you’re shooting in a faraway location and need to see those pictures immediately, a built-in viewer is a must. A built-in viewer also makes it easy to set the camera at the right angle and height. If your memory card is running low on space, you can also use the viewer to delete some pictures and recover space for more images. Conclusion One more important feature needs to be mentioned here, and that is security. The best trail camera entails a considerable investment, so make sure there’s some form of protection provided. At the very least there should be a box made of steel or some other durable material to protect it from scratches and blows. There should also be a locking mechanism and of course, a camo pattern design so they blend in the background and won’t get easily noticed. Contents Top 7 Trail Camera Comparisons Reconyx SM750 HyperFire License Plate Capture Camera Features Pros Cons Bushnell Trophy Cam HD Features Pros Cons Covert Extreme Red HD Features Pros Cons Browning Strike Force Trail Camera Features Pros Cons Primos 12MP Low Glow Proof Cam Features Pros Cons Stealth Cam Infrared Scouting Camera Features Pros Cons Moultrie A-40i Game Camera Features Pros Cons What to Look For Memory Storage Other Features to Consider Conclusion

Summary

The iconic AK47 rifle has been around for more than 50 years and is still going strong as the choice of rifle for freedom fighters as well as terrorists all around the globe. In that time people have developed synthetic stocks, rail systems and better triggers and muzzle devices for this old war horse. The old style 45* slant brake that came attached to the end of many varieties of AK47 rifles was revolutionary and effective in 1947 but by the 21st century people wanted more options and better ways control the recoil and muzzle rise from their AK47 pattern rifles.